Discussion:
Greetings From A New Member
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Syzygy
2004-10-09 18:50:36 UTC
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My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.

Kaixo,
Syz
Synn
2004-10-09 19:34:06 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome and Merry Meet.

*
~Synn~
*
Speak ye little, Listen much.
*
Syzygy
2004-10-10 16:00:24 UTC
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Post by Synn
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome and Merry Meet.
Thank you, Synn.
Post by Synn
*
~Synn~
*
Speak ye little, Listen much.
*
Jackdaw
2004-10-09 21:31:18 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome to the newsgroup.
I have recently heard Basque Dance music with pipes and drums. ( On the
BBC )
My feet went all over the place.
Your country is beautiful and there is magic in the mountains.
Please stay.
--
Jackdaw, collector of facts, trivia and bright twinkly things.
Folio--- http://www.jackdaw-crafts.co.uk
Syzygy
2004-10-10 16:00:46 UTC
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Post by Jackdaw
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome to the newsgroup.
I have recently heard Basque Dance music with pipes and drums. ( On the
BBC )
My feet went all over the place.
Your country is beautiful and there is magic in the mountains.
Please stay.
Thank you, Jackdaw. I agree. I love the mountains as well.

Kaixo,
Syz
Joseph Littleshoes
2004-10-09 21:35:18 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Hello Syzgy:

I am just curious what the Basque word for witch is. Is there a common
word used by both believers and non believers or word/s that would be
used prejudicially by non believers and rejected by believers? Or have
believers embraced a prejudicial word as their own?

Is there a theology you can discuss? Techniques, practices, tools etc.
etc.

Generally speaking i have found more similarities than differences in so
called "primitive" religion but i am always interested in different
points of view, especially from actual adherents to a religion as
opposed to an anthropological analysis by an outsider.
--
Joseph Littleshoes
Linda Seekins
2004-10-10 05:52:30 UTC
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Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
I am just curious what the Basque word for witch is. Is there a common
word used by both believers and non believers or word/s that would be
used prejudicially by non believers and rejected by believers? Or have
believers embraced a prejudicial word as their own?
Is there a theology you can discuss? Techniques, practices, tools etc.
etc.
Generally speaking i have found more similarities than differences in so
called "primitive" religion but i am always interested in different
points of view, especially from actual adherents to a religion as
opposed to an anthropological analysis by an outsider.
--
Joseph Littleshoes
Oh, I'd like to know more, too, about the religion, the customs and anything
else that you feel free to share. Years ago, I read the book "The Roots of
Witchcraft" by Michael Harrison, in which he discussed how many of the terms
used by today's witches, such as the word "athame", may have come from the
Basque language. He also discussed the Eko Eko chant and how it seems to
have a Basque origin. I would like to know how accurate he was.

I also think that it was the same author who said that any last names with
the "ask" sound in them was from the Basque. My grandfather's name was
Bascom, which does suggest it, but is this really a Basque name?

Thank you,
Vanirhawk




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Joseph Littleshoes
2004-10-10 09:10:01 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country
is
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the
dominating
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families
in
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I
cannot
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I
refuse
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I
hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
I am just curious what the Basque word for witch is. Is there a
common
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
word used by both believers and non believers or word/s that would
be
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
used prejudicially by non believers and rejected by believers? Or
have
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
believers embraced a prejudicial word as their own?
Is there a theology you can discuss? Techniques, practices, tools
etc.
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
etc.
Generally speaking i have found more similarities than differences
in so
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
called "primitive" religion but i am always interested in different
points of view, especially from actual adherents to a religion as
opposed to an anthropological analysis by an outsider.
--
Joseph Littleshoes
Oh, I'd like to know more, too, about the religion, the customs and anything
else that you feel free to share. Years ago, I read the book "The Roots of
Witchcraft" by Michael Harrison, in which he discussed how many of the terms
used by today's witches, such as the word "athame", may have come from the
Basque language. He also discussed the Eko Eko chant and how it seems to
have a Basque origin. I would like to know how accurate he was.
I also think that it was the same author who said that any last names with
the "ask" sound in them was from the Basque. My grandfather's name was
Bascom, which does suggest it, but is this really a Basque name?
Thank you,
Vanirhawk
And please allow me to apologize for my use of the word "religion" in my
original response to Syngy' post.

There are many for whom the term "wicca" and all its English variations
denote as much a "life style" as a religion, a way of being rather than
a specific set of beliefs, practices and conceptualizations about the
universe and our place in it. Often it represents a very spiritual life
style that has its "spirituality" so merged with living life that here
is no distinction and hence no objective "religion" nothing set aside
and easily identifiable as "religion" but rather a life style that is
religion. And often in the most brutal survival sense. These people
tend to be very instinctual if not out right psychic. As an ordinary,
everyday part of their living.

Even when not overtly recognized by the community, the instincts are,
never the less, felt and acted upon, as much by the community as any
individual.
--
JL
Syzygy
2004-10-10 21:53:09 UTC
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Post by Linda Seekins
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
I am just curious what the Basque word for witch is. Is there a common
word used by both believers and non believers or word/s that would be
used prejudicially by non believers and rejected by believers? Or have
believers embraced a prejudicial word as their own?
Is there a theology you can discuss? Techniques, practices, tools etc.
etc.
Generally speaking i have found more similarities than differences in so
called "primitive" religion but i am always interested in different
points of view, especially from actual adherents to a religion as
opposed to an anthropological analysis by an outsider.
--
Joseph Littleshoes
Oh, I'd like to know more, too, about the religion, the customs and anything
else that you feel free to share. Years ago, I read the book "The Roots of
Witchcraft" by Michael Harrison, in which he discussed how many of the terms
used by today's witches, such as the word "athame", may have come from the
Basque language. He also discussed the Eko Eko chant and how it seems to
have a Basque origin. I would like to know how accurate he was.
I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with any such chant. And "athame" is not
a Basque word.

Our language is very old, and no one is really certain where it comes
from so speculation is quite common.
Post by Linda Seekins
I also think that it was the same author who said that any last names with
the "ask" sound in them was from the Basque. My grandfather's name was
Bascom, which does suggest it, but is this really a Basque name?
No, Bascom is not a Basque name. It sounds vaguely British to me, but
I'm not a linguist, either.

Kaixo,
Syz
Post by Linda Seekins
Thank you,
Vanirhawk
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Linda Seekins
2004-10-11 08:36:45 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
Oh, I'd like to know more, too, about the religion, the customs and anything
else that you feel free to share. Years ago, I read the book "The Roots of
Witchcraft" by Michael Harrison, in which he discussed how many of the terms
used by today's witches, such as the word "athame", may have come from the
Basque language. He also discussed the Eko Eko chant and how it seems to
have a Basque origin. I would like to know how accurate he was.
I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with any such chant. And "athame" is not
a Basque word.
Our language is very old, and no one is really certain where it comes
from so speculation is quite common.
Post by Linda Seekins
I also think that it was the same author who said that any last names with
the "ask" sound in them was from the Basque. My grandfather's name was
Bascom, which does suggest it, but is this really a Basque name?
No, Bascom is not a Basque name. It sounds vaguely British to me, but
I'm not a linguist, either.
Kaixo,
Syz
Thank you for the information. It's been so long since I read that book that
I may have mixed up the information with something else I have read. As for
my grandfather, his ancestry is French with some English, so I really
couldn't say as to which side the name comes from.

(Just located the book!) The Eko chant goes:

"Eko Eko Azarak Eko Eko Zomelak (or Zamilak)
Bagabi Lacha bachabe
Lamac cahi achababe
Karellyos

Lamac Lamac Bachalyas
Cabahagy sabalyos
Baryolos

Lagoz atha cabyolas
Samahac atha famolas
Hurrahya."

According to the author of "The Roots of Witchcraft", Michael Harrison, this
has been garbled over the years through mispronounciation, but he does
attempt to put it into the Basque original (that is, according to him):
(cut and paste into notepad to get this to line up)

Ritual word Possible Basque Original English

Eko Eho 'kill', 'grind, 'digest'
Azarak Azaroac '(the) November'
Zamilak zamariac 'I shall transport thee
thyself
(or)
Zomelak zaramat
Bagabi bahe-gabe 'without a sieve'
(or)
bah'gabe
Lacha laxa 'to wash'
Bachabi bachera 'plates and dishes'
Karellyos garallaz 'with sand'
Lamac lanac '(the) work'
Bachalyas Bacheraz 'with plates and dishes'
Cabahagy Khoporagei 'destined for the drinking
cup'
Sabalyos sabelaz 'with the stomach, entrails,
belly, etc.'
Baryolos balijoaz 'if they went' or 'if they
were to go'
Lagoz lakhaz '(with) a full measure, full
quantity'
Atha (probably) eta 'and'
Cabyolas khoporaz 'in the goblet or drinking
vessel'
Samahac semiac 'the sons'
Atha eta 'and'
Famolas familiaz '(who are) with the Family'
Hurrahya (ritual cry)

He then writes this out in English as:

"Kil (for the Feast) in November; kill! I shall transport thee there myself,
and without the aid of a sieve, to scour the plates and dishes with sand:
work (which must be done) with those plates and dishes. (We shall meet our
friends) ready for the drinking-cup if they shall go (to the Feast), their
bellies full with quaffing from the drinking-cup. O Sons (of the Master)
with your Families, (shout His praises with the cry:) 'Hurrahya'!"

Probably this is not at all accurate or is pure gibberish on the part of the
author.

Blessings,
Linda




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Syzygy
2004-10-12 00:20:01 UTC
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Post by Linda Seekins
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
Oh, I'd like to know more, too, about the religion, the customs and
anything
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
else that you feel free to share. Years ago, I read the book "The Roots
of
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
Witchcraft" by Michael Harrison, in which he discussed how many of the
terms
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
used by today's witches, such as the word "athame", may have come from
the
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
Basque language. He also discussed the Eko Eko chant and how it seems to
have a Basque origin. I would like to know how accurate he was.
I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with any such chant. And "athame" is not
a Basque word.
Our language is very old, and no one is really certain where it comes
from so speculation is quite common.
Post by Linda Seekins
I also think that it was the same author who said that any last names
with
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
the "ask" sound in them was from the Basque. My grandfather's name was
Bascom, which does suggest it, but is this really a Basque name?
No, Bascom is not a Basque name. It sounds vaguely British to me, but
I'm not a linguist, either.
Kaixo,
Syz
Thank you for the information. It's been so long since I read that book that
I may have mixed up the information with something else I have read. As for
my grandfather, his ancestry is French with some English, so I really
couldn't say as to which side the name comes from.
"Eko Eko Azarak Eko Eko Zomelak (or Zamilak)
Bagabi Lacha bachabe
Lamac cahi achababe
Karellyos
Lamac Lamac Bachalyas
Cabahagy sabalyos
Baryolos
Lagoz atha cabyolas
Samahac atha famolas
Hurrahya."
According to the author of "The Roots of Witchcraft", Michael Harrison, this
has been garbled over the years through mispronounciation, but he does
(cut and paste into notepad to get this to line up)
Ritual word Possible Basque Original English
Eko Eho 'kill', 'grind, 'digest'
Azarak Azaroac '(the) November'
Zamilak zamariac 'I shall transport thee
thyself
(or)
Zomelak zaramat
Bagabi bahe-gabe 'without a sieve'
(or)
bah'gabe
Lacha laxa 'to wash'
Bachabi bachera 'plates and dishes'
Karellyos garallaz 'with sand'
Lamac lanac '(the) work'
Bachalyas Bacheraz 'with plates and dishes'
Cabahagy Khoporagei 'destined for the drinking
cup'
Sabalyos sabelaz 'with the stomach, entrails,
belly, etc.'
Baryolos balijoaz 'if they went' or 'if they
were to go'
Lagoz lakhaz '(with) a full measure, full
quantity'
Atha (probably) eta 'and'
Cabyolas khoporaz 'in the goblet or drinking
vessel'
Samahac semiac 'the sons'
Atha eta 'and'
Famolas familiaz '(who are) with the Family'
Hurrahya (ritual cry)
"Kil (for the Feast) in November; kill! I shall transport thee there myself,
work (which must be done) with those plates and dishes. (We shall meet our
friends) ready for the drinking-cup if they shall go (to the Feast), their
bellies full with quaffing from the drinking-cup. O Sons (of the Master)
with your Families, (shout His praises with the cry:) 'Hurrahya'!"
Probably this is not at all accurate or is pure gibberish on the part of the
author.
I would say do not rely on this as a Basque chant. There is no "Master"
in our work. Mari is the mother of our pantheon, and while there are
masculine beings, such as the basajaunak (wild men), they are not on the
same level as Mari.

Gabon,
Syz
Post by Linda Seekins
Blessings,
Linda
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Shez
2004-10-11 13:47:06 UTC
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In article <***@uni-berlin.de>, Syzygy <***@nospam.org>
writes
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
I am just curious what the Basque word for witch is. Is there a common
word used by both believers and non believers or word/s that would be
used prejudicially by non believers and rejected by believers? Or have
believers embraced a prejudicial word as their own?
Is there a theology you can discuss? Techniques, practices, tools etc.
etc.
Generally speaking i have found more similarities than differences in so
called "primitive" religion but i am always interested in different
points of view, especially from actual adherents to a religion as
opposed to an anthropological analysis by an outsider.
--
Joseph Littleshoes
Oh, I'd like to know more, too, about the religion, the customs and anything
else that you feel free to share. Years ago, I read the book "The Roots of
Witchcraft" by Michael Harrison, in which he discussed how many of the terms
used by today's witches, such as the word "athame", may have come from the
Basque language. He also discussed the Eko Eko chant and how it seems to
have a Basque origin. I would like to know how accurate he was.
I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with any such chant. And "athame" is not
a Basque word.
Our language is very old, and no one is really certain where it comes
from so speculation is quite common.
Post by Linda Seekins
I also think that it was the same author who said that any last names with
the "ask" sound in them was from the Basque. My grandfather's name was
Bascom, which does suggest it, but is this really a Basque name?
No, Bascom is not a Basque name. It sounds vaguely British to me, but
I'm not a linguist, either.
Kaixo,
Syz
Post by Linda Seekins
Thank you,
Vanirhawk
Bascom sounds to me like a village name, a lot of people in Britain used
the name of their village of town as their last names in medieval times,
though sometimes the spelling is not exact, it might be your family
originally came from Boscom
Post by Syzygy
Post by Linda Seekins
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--
Shez ***@oldcity.f2s.com
Shez's Garden at http://www.oldcity.f2s.com/shez/
Baird Stafford
2004-10-11 18:30:20 UTC
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Shez <***@oldcity.f2s.com> wrote:

<snip>
Post by Shez
Bascom sounds to me like a village name, a lot of people in Britain
used the name of their village of town as their last names in medieval
times, though sometimes the spelling is not exact, it might be your
family originally came from Boscom
The usage was common throughout Europe, I believe, and in Italy, at
least, indicated that parentage on the father's side was, er, unofficial
at best....

Blessed be,
Baird
who found this out when he asked why Leonardo was named for the town of
Vinci....
Shez
2004-10-11 22:36:35 UTC
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Post by Baird Stafford
<snip>
Post by Shez
Bascom sounds to me like a village name, a lot of people in Britain
used the name of their village of town as their last names in medieval
times, though sometimes the spelling is not exact, it might be your
family originally came from Boscom
The usage was common throughout Europe, I believe, and in Italy, at
least, indicated that parentage on the father's side was, er, unofficial
at best....
The polite term is the wrong side of the blanket, but its usually that
the child was born out of wedlock... which was pretty normal for the
time. Not even a big deal, and many people never got married in church..
So were not officaly married for the church registery.

My Uncle traced back one line of my family and took it back quite a long
way, among my ancestors was a lord ( wrong side of the blanket ) and a
highwayman who got hung... from the sublime to the ridiculous really :)
Post by Baird Stafford
Blessed be,
Baird
who found this out when he asked why Leonardo was named for the town of
Vinci....
--
Shez ***@oldcity.f2s.com
Shez's Garden at http://www.oldcity.f2s.com/shez/
Gale
2004-10-12 01:24:11 UTC
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Shez wrote:
<snip>
Post by Shez
The polite term is the wrong side of the blanket, but its usually that
the child was born out of wedlock... which was pretty normal for the
time. Not even a big deal, and many people never got married in church..
So were not officaly married for the church registery.
<snip>

I'm taking my English Lit classes a-Maying at some point in the next few
days, with Robert Herrick & his Corrine. So I'll be mentioning grass
widows. (Yes, going a-Maying at almost Samhain -- entirely on the wrong
side of the sun. However, my Am Lit section gets Irving, Poe &
Hawthorne's "Ethan Brand" in the next few days -- all in season.)

BB,
Gale
Demi
2004-10-12 01:15:14 UTC
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That reminds me of a couple years ago.... it was early May, and I was
teaching 9-12th graders. One tenth grade class was reading early English
poetry.... it had been a long, long, ugly cold winter that year; then in
May, the weather was finally getting pretty. We all had spring fever at
that point, and so I couldn't resist. I gave them ribbons, played "Summer
is a'comin' in, sing we all cuckoo" and had them wrap a pole on the grounds
outside (the pole was already there; it was a utility pole of some sort).
They had a great time. (experiential learning, you know)

As we placidly and peacefully wrapped the ribbons around the makeshift
Maypole, one girl thought to ask a reasonable question:

Girl: "Ms Demi, in old Britain and Europe, what was the symbolism and
purpose of this custom originally?"

Me: "Well, the custom hasn't really died out. They still do this in Europe
and America as well. They have an annual "steal the Maypole" festival in the
town where I lived in Germany."

Girl: "But what does this mean? What's the meaning behind it?"

(And I'm thinking: 'You gotta be kidding, It's obvious!')

Me: "Well, it was a sort of fertility rite, like throwing rice at a couple
at a wedding. The idea was to celebrate life and fertility as the fields
were being readied for planting."

Girls: "FERTILITY???? THIS IS A *FERTILITY* RITE??
AAAAIIIIIIIIIIIIIEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!"

And they dropped the ribbons as if they were firebrands, and ran away!!
(the boys just laughed)

LOL
Post by Baird Stafford
<snip>
Post by Shez
The polite term is the wrong side of the blanket, but its usually that
the child was born out of wedlock... which was pretty normal for the
time. Not even a big deal, and many people never got married in church..
So were not officaly married for the church registery.
<snip>
I'm taking my English Lit classes a-Maying at some point in the next few
days, with Robert Herrick & his Corrine. So I'll be mentioning grass
widows. (Yes, going a-Maying at almost Samhain -- entirely on the wrong
side of the sun. However, my Am Lit section gets Irving, Poe & Hawthorne's
"Ethan Brand" in the next few days -- all in season.)
BB,
Gale
Shez
2004-10-12 16:40:28 UTC
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Post by Baird Stafford
<snip>
Post by Shez
The polite term is the wrong side of the blanket, but its usually that
the child was born out of wedlock... which was pretty normal for the
time. Not even a big deal, and many people never got married in church..
So were not officaly married for the church registery.
<snip>
I'm taking my English Lit classes a-Maying at some point in the next few
days, with Robert Herrick & his Corrine. So I'll be mentioning grass
widows. (Yes, going a-Maying at almost Samhain -- entirely on the wrong
side of the sun. However, my Am Lit section gets Irving, Poe &
Hawthorne's "Ethan Brand" in the next few days -- all in season.)
BB,
Gale
A Maying is always fun, its spring for a start and after a cold wet
winter its a time when your blood fizzes and a young mans fancy.. And
all that sort of stuff ( not to mention a young woman's fancy :)
Have a wonderful time...
--
Shez ***@oldcity.f2s.com
Shez's Garden at http://www.oldcity.f2s.com/shez/
Syzygy
2004-10-10 21:52:46 UTC
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Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
I am just curious what the Basque word for witch is. Is there a common
word used by both believers and non believers or word/s that would be
used prejudicially by non believers and rejected by believers? Or have
believers embraced a prejudicial word as their own?
A witch would be called a sorguine, also spelled sorgin. The name is
closely related to that of a cave-dwelling spirit. To this day, caves
are where many of our sorguines interact with spirits, or entities. Even
Mari, our primary goddess, is associated with the caves.
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Is there a theology you can discuss? Techniques, practices, tools etc.
etc.
Generally, I can tell you that it is nature-driven. A sorguine finds her
resources around her, so the difficult but rich terrain of the Pyrenees
mountains is well-suited to our craft.

A great difference among the sorguines is that they are born such.
Typically, a witch is born to a witch. There are no witch schools where
anyone can come and learn. There are no Basque authors writing books
about how to become a sorguine. You are prepared by your parents or
grandparents for what is generally a secretive part of your life.

Kaixo,
Syz
Post by Joseph Littleshoes
Generally speaking i have found more similarities than differences in so
called "primitive" religion but i am always interested in different
points of view, especially from actual adherents to a religion as
opposed to an anthropological analysis by an outsider.
--
Joseph Littleshoes
Jackdaw
2004-10-10 22:32:18 UTC
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SNIP
Post by Syzygy
A witch would be called a sorguine, also spelled sorgin. The name is
closely related to that of a cave-dwelling spirit. To this day, caves
are where many of our sorguines interact with spirits, or entities. Even
Mari, our primary goddess, is associated with the caves.
Would that be "The Black Mari / Mary"?
I have seen the Rom make pilgrimages to her image, which I belive was in a
crypt or perhaps a cave.
--
Jackdaw, collector of facts, trivia and bright twinkly things.
Folio--- http://www.jackdaw-crafts.co.uk
Syzygy
2004-10-12 00:20:05 UTC
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Post by Jackdaw
SNIP
Post by Syzygy
A witch would be called a sorguine, also spelled sorgin. The name is
closely related to that of a cave-dwelling spirit. To this day, caves
are where many of our sorguines interact with spirits, or entities. Even
Mari, our primary goddess, is associated with the caves.
Would that be "The Black Mari / Mary"?
I have seen the Rom make pilgrimages to her image, which I belive was in a
crypt or perhaps a cave.
My family does not refer to her as Black Mari, only as Mari. I have
heard of the worship of the Black Virgin in various countries around the
world, and at some level, the Mary of the Christian religion may be a
cognate of our Goddess Mari.

Gabon,
Syz
Jackdaw
2004-10-12 07:15:39 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
Post by Jackdaw
Would that be "The Black Mari / Mary"?
I have seen the Rom make pilgrimages to her image, which I belive was in a
crypt or perhaps a cave.
My family does not refer to her as Black Mari, only as Mari. I have
heard of the worship of the Black Virgin in various countries around the
world, and at some level, the Mary of the Christian religion may be a
cognate of our Goddess Mari.
Gabon,
Syz
Thanks for the information.
--
Jackdaw, collector of facts, trivia and bright twinkly things.
Folio--- http://www.jackdaw-crafts.co.uk
carl
2004-10-12 23:12:04 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
My family does not refer to her as Black Mari, only as Mari.
I have heard that that Mari is likely to be Kali as a protectoress
and as been carried from Indian through Turkey and into Europe.
It was just above Turkey that her worship connected with the
virgin of Christianity which helped previous many aspects of the worship,
including giving her a Christian acceptable (and still potent female)
face.
Post by Syzygy
I have
heard of the worship of the Black Virgin in various countries around the
world, and at some level, the Mary of the Christian religion may be a
cognate of our Goddess Mari.
Jackdaw
2004-10-13 07:15:33 UTC
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Post by carl
Post by Syzygy
My family does not refer to her as Black Mari, only as Mari.
I have heard that that Mari is likely to be Kali as a protectoress
and as been carried from Indian through Turkey and into Europe.
It was just above Turkey that her worship connected with the
virgin of Christianity which helped previous many aspects of the worship,
including giving her a Christian acceptable (and still potent female)
face.
Post by Syzygy
I have
heard of the worship of the Black Virgin in various countries around the
world, and at some level, the Mary of the Christian religion may be a
cognate of our Goddess Mari.
Thankyou for that. I will follow up that lead ... later.
--
Jackdaw, collector of facts, trivia and bright twinkly things.
Folio--- http://www.jackdaw-crafts.co.uk
Dale
2004-10-09 23:51:55 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy.
Are you also, by chance, a Necroscope fan? :)

Welcome to the group!
--
Dale - Liverpool, England

A menace to society - apparently!

Spam block: Please don't mail me with "abuse" - use my name instead!
Syzygy
2004-10-12 00:20:08 UTC
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Post by Dale
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy.
Are you also, by chance, a Necroscope fan? :)
Sorry, I am not familiar with a Necroscope.

Syz
Post by Dale
Welcome to the group!
francis
2004-10-10 19:57:12 UTC
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In message <***@uni-berlin.de>, Syzygy <***@nospam.org>
writes
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is
very much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the
dominating influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain
families in many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things
that I cannot speak of so I hope you will not be offended if
occassionally I refuse some information when asked. I speak resonably
good English, and I hope to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome.

Do the able-bodied men of the village still take the livestock up to the
summer pastures at about the time of Beltane and stay up there until
about the time of Samhain when they all return to the village for the
winter?
--
Francis
Syzygy
2004-10-12 00:20:12 UTC
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Post by francis
writes
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is
very much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the
dominating influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain
families in many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things
that I cannot speak of so I hope you will not be offended if
occassionally I refuse some information when asked. I speak resonably
good English, and I hope to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome.
Do the able-bodied men of the village still take the livestock up to the
summer pastures at about the time of Beltane and stay up there until
about the time of Samhain when they all return to the village for the
winter?
Well, times vary, and sheepherding is a lonely and taxing business. My
family, fortunately, were not shepherds.

Gabon,
Syz
Reynir Stefánsson
2004-10-11 01:31:21 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
No worries. You're not the first FamTrad to tread these timbers. Won't
be the last one either, I reckon.
--
Té Rowan (***@mi.is)
Syzygy
2004-10-12 00:20:19 UTC
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Post by Reynir Stefánsson
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
No worries. You're not the first FamTrad to tread these timbers. Won't
be the last one either, I reckon.
Well, very good. Thank you for your greeting.

Gabon,
Syz
-A.
2004-10-12 00:20:31 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is very
much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the dominating
influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain families in
many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things that I cannot
speak of so I hope you will not be offended if occassionally I refuse
some information when asked. I speak resonably good English, and I hope
to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome and Merry Meet!

Blessed Be,
-A.
Syzygy
2004-10-12 00:20:22 UTC
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Post by -A.
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch. Witchcraft in my country is
very much a closed subject since the Spanish Inquistion and the
dominating influence of Christianity, but it thrives among certain
families in many of the mountain villages. There are a lot of things
that I cannot speak of so I hope you will not be offended if
occassionally I refuse some information when asked. I speak resonably
good English, and I hope to participate in some interesting discussions.
Kaixo,
Syz
Welcome and Merry Meet!
Thank you.

Gabon,
Syz
Post by -A.
Blessed Be,
-A.
Lady Nina
2004-10-12 11:25:21 UTC
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Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch.
Funny that, I just saw your header with the sign off Caliban
elsewhere. Such a shame when people take advantage of arwm's welcoming
nature for their own agendas isn't it?
--
Lady Nina
And people wonder why I'm suspicious

ZXR400 CG125 mps ZX-9R lrtc
Morgan Azstarelle
2004-10-12 16:18:25 UTC
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Post by Lady Nina
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch.
Funny that, I just saw your header with the sign off Caliban
elsewhere. Such a shame when people take advantage of arwm's welcoming
nature for their own agendas isn't it?
not again... arrrgh.

Morgan
Jackdaw
2004-10-12 18:40:49 UTC
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Post by Morgan Azstarelle
Post by Lady Nina
Post by Syzygy
My name is Syzygy. I am a Basque witch.
Funny that, I just saw your header with the sign off Caliban
elsewhere. Such a shame when people take advantage of arwm's welcoming
nature for their own agendas isn't it?
not again... arrrgh.
Morgan
I noticed that slip too. It would have been great to have a real Basque on
the alt.religion.wicca.mod newsgroup.
Makes me feel cheated on somehow. Not a good feeling.
< sigh >
--
Jackdaw, collector of facts, trivia and bright twinkly things.
Folio--- http://www.jackdaw-crafts.co.uk
p***@gmail.com
2014-07-18 08:52:47 UTC
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Hi,

I was wondering if you offered any teaching from maybe the oldest form of witchcraft (Basque that is). I've been reading about Sugaar and of course the eko eko chant.

Please email,
***@yahoo.com

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